Facts about the Job Hunt

 

General Facts

About Truthfulness

About Job-hunt Strategies

GENERAL FACTS

FACT: Survey of 411 human resources recruiters (2014 Society for Human Resource Management survey: “Résumés, Cover Letters and Interviews” survey, 4/28/14):

  • Although two-thirds (66%) of organizations prefer chronological résumés, which list education and experience in reverse chronological order, government agencies (30%) prefer functionally organized résumés more than private-sector organizations do (18%).
  • Government agencies (34%) are more likely than private-sector organizations (20%) to consider a missing cover letter a mistake. Smaller organizations (those with fewer than 500 employees) (33%) are more likely to consider a missing cover letter a mistake than are larger organizations (17%).
  • Government agencies are more likely to use panel interviews and structured interviews, whereas private-sector organizations are more likely to use semi-structured interviews and screening interviews. Although online interviews are rarely used, they are more likely to be used by larger employers (100 or more employees), as are structured interviews and panel interviews.
  • Only 4% of private-sector employers (and 15% in the government sector) believe an interviewee should try to explain in their cover letter (or résumé) why they were fired or laid off from a position. Seventy-seven percent of respondents believe this information should only be relayed during the interview.
  • Fifty-seven percent of respondents indicated that job candidates should neither emphasize nor hide gaps in employment, while 39% indicated candidates should clearly indicate gaps in employment. Only 2% agreed that gaps were not relevant.
  • The majority of respondents said they prefer to receive résumés through their organization’s website.
  • It takes most HR professionals less than five minutes to determine whether a job candidate will proceed to the next step of the selection process.

FACT: What corporate recruiters say are the two most important attributes for recent graduates (2011 survey by the Graduate Management Admission Council; CNBC, 11/11/13):

  • Communication skills
  • Practical experience

FACT: On average, job-seekers spend just 76.7 seconds reading job ads before deciding to apply or not (survey by TheLadders; Wall St. Journal, 10/14/13).

FACT: Women generally apply to jobs only when they believe they meet all the requirements in a posting, whereas mean will throw their hat in the ring if they think they meet just 60% of the qualifications (internal study by Hewlett-Packard Co.; Wall St. Journal, 10/14/13).

FACT: “In a classic study, sociologist Mark Granovetter showed that people were 58% more likely to get a new job through weak ties than strong ties. Our closest contacts tend to know the same people and information as we do. Weak ties travel in different circles and learn different things, so they can offer us more efficient access to novel information. Most of us miss out on this novel information, filling our networks with people whose perspectives are too similar to our own” (Adam Grant, Wharton professor and best-selling business book author; LinkedIn, 6/19/13).

FACT: According to a recent study, the chances of an unemployed job-searcher getting called in for an interview drop dramatically once they’ve been out of work for six months or longer (The Atlantic, 4/13/13):

  • The study was performed by Rand Ghayad (a scholar at the Boston Fed and a PhD candidate in economics at Northeastern University) and William Dickens (a professor of economics at Northeastern University).
  • Ghayad sent out 4,800 fictitious resumes to 600 job openings, with 3,600 of them for fake unemployed people. Among the 3,600, he varied how long they'd been out of work, how often they'd switched jobs, and whether they had any industry experience. Everything else was kept constant. The mocked-up resumes were all male, all had randomly-selected (and racially ambiguous) names, and all had similar education backgrounds.
  • The average callback rate for those unemployed for six months or longer (with industry experience): less than 2%.
  • The average callback rate for those unemployed “medium” length of time (with industry experience): 14%.
  • The average callback rate for the “short-term” unemployed (with industry experience): 16%.
  • The average callback rate for the short-term unemployed with NO industry experience: 9%.

FACT: “Duncan Mathison, an outplacement executive and co-author of the 2009 book "Unlock the Hidden Job Market," concedes that anything hidden is difficult to measure but, by parsing labor statistics and recruiting surveys, he calculates that around 50% of positions are currently filled on an informal basis” [when the hiring manager promotes a current employee or hires an outsider he knows personally]. (Wall St. Journal, 1/8/13)

FACT: Since the economic downturn of 2007, slightly more than half of all job seekers over age 55 have been unemployed for more than six months. In 2003, just 23% of unemployed seniors were forced to look for jobs that long (report from the federal Government Accountability Office; Reuters, 5/15/12).

FACT: When a worker is laid off or fired, their mental health typically dips immediately, then slowly improves — until 10 to 12 weeks after the initial severance, when, if still unemployed, the person's mental health will again start to slide (University of Minnesota study published in the April/May Academy of Management Journal; Wall St. Journal, 4/24/12).

FACT: Seven out of 10 senior managers say face-to-face meetings are the most valuable form of interaction when establishing a relationship. When an in-person meeting isn’t possible, email is most preferred, followed by phone, instant messaging, then Web conferencing (Economist magazine; Wall St. Journal, 4/24/12).

FACT: A recent study from the Pew Research Center shows that 40% of people unemployed for six months or more report lower self-respect and are more likely to seek professional help for depression or other emotional problems (Advertising Age, 1/30/12).

FACT: “While surveys show that personal connections are a primary source of hires, today's job seekers devote little time to their networks: Only 9% of their job search is spent contacting friends and relatives to find work, while 51% is devoted to finding ads and sending out applications,” (research by Princeton economist Alan Krueger and Andreas Mueller of the Columbia Business School; Wall St. Journal, 8/22/11).

FACT: As job searches stretch out, job-seekers become more disillusioned, and spend less time searching for work (research by Princeton economist Alan Krueger and Andreas Mueller of the Columbia Business School; Wall St. Journal, 8/22/11).

FACT: In 2011, 58% of interns were offered full-time jobs with their temporary employers — up from about 35% in 2005. The vast majority of those interns (61%) were in paid internships, while only 38% of unpaid interns were offered full-time employment (National Association of Colleges and Employers 2011 student/employer surveys; Workforce Management magazine, 8/11).

FACT: Job-seekers who landed jobs in 2007 (just before the Great Recession) spent an average of five weeks looking for work. In 2010, it typically took job-seekers twice as long (10 weeks) to land a job (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report, 5/11).

FACT: In 2007 (just before the Great Recession), job seekers who couldn’t find work spent an average of 8.5 weeks looking, then gave up. In 2010, job-seekers who couldn’t find work spent more than twice as much time (20 weeks) looking (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report, 5/11).

FACT: Management assessments are booming again as companies scramble to find the best leaders amid a hiring rebound. Companies are using business-simulation exercises, role-playing, online personality tests and sit-down talks with an educational psychologist to gauge key traits of C-suite candidates. According to market-research firm Aberdeen Group, 72% of the 516 employers it surveys are now using assessments to help make executive promotion decisions — nearly a 100% increase from 2010. Assessing a C-suite candidate can cost up to $30,000 and last two days (Wall St. Journal, 5/12/11).

FACT: “Although most people involved in seeking talent aren’t formally trained in onomatology, studies have shown that recruiters and hiring managers — consciously or not — assess candidates on the basis of a name. John Cotton, a management professor at Marquette University in Milwaukee is co-author of the 2008 research publication, 'The Name Game: Affective and Hiring Reactions to First Names.' Cotton, whose Ph.D. is in psychology, and his colleagues discovered that common names were best liked and most likely to be hired. Unusual names were least liked and unlikely to be hired, while Russian and African-American names fell somewhere in between but were still much less likely to be hired. ‘People like people who are similar to themselves,’ says Cotton, who advises prospective parents to make safe choices when it comes to naming their babies” (Workforce Management Online, 5/11).

FACT: In 2010, 86.5% of the interns offered jobs accepted them — a slight increase from 2009 when 83.9% accepted these offers (National Association of Colleges and Employers study; CNN Money, 4/28/11).

FACT: According to the latest CareerXroads’ survey of employers, 50.3% of all jobs are filled by promotions and internal transfers of current employees. Plus, the research shows this internal-hiring trend is only growing stronger: In 2005, just 38% of jobs were filled by internal candidates, compared to 50.3% today (10th annual CareerXroads Source of Hire Study, 3/11).

FACT: According to the latest CareerXroads’ survey of employers, 27.5% of the people hired from outside the company were referred by current employees (10th annual CareerXroads Source of Hire Study, 3/11).

FACT: According to CareerXroads’ surveys from 2005 through 2009, employers typically find about 13% of their new-hires (people hired from outside the company) via job listings posted on job boards. However, in the 2010 survey, employers reported that 25% of their new-hires were coming via job boards (9th and 10th annual CareerXroads Source of Hire Study, 2/10 and 3/11).

FACT: According to the latest CareerXroads’ survey of employers, 18.8% of their new-hires (people hired from outside the company) used the company’s website to find and apply for open positions. However, the researchers are quick to point out the major flaw in this statistic: Many of the job-seekers who end up on a company career page were routed there via other sources, such as job-board postings, referrals, etc. (10th annual CareerXroads Source of Hire Study, 3/11).

FACT: “Niche job boards continue to proliferate, allowing employers to go directly to the A-level performers, who typically focus their job search efforts on specialized search engines.” Today, there are more than 100,000 Internet job boards – double the number in 2000 (Weddles research; Workforce Management magazine, 3/11).

FACT: 48% of HR managers say they typically review up to 25 applications for one open position (CareerBuilder survey of 2,500 employers; Workplace Management, 9/16/10).

FACT: In a study of 233 unemployed people throughout a three-week job-search, one in five participants spent less than 10 hours per week on their job searches (University of Minnesota study, "The Job Search Grind," Academy of Management Journal, 8/4/10).

FACT: "On average, surveys find, the unemployed in the U.S. spend 40 minutes a day looking for work and three hours and 20 minutes a day watching TV" (Wall St. Journal, 5/6/10).

FACT: The most common mistakes applicants make with cover letters are typically blatant errors — like addressing them to the wrong company or misspelling the recipient's name (Clare Shanahan, senior director of talent acquisition for Fireman's Fund Insurance Co.; Wall St. Journal, 3/9/10).

FACT: Don't be surprised if you never hear back after applying/interviewing for a job. Only 27% of large companies (those with at least 500 employees) have a formal process for declining external candidates (CareerXroads survey of 56 large employers; Wall St. Journal, 1/26/10).

FACT: "More than half of people who return to work after career breaks land jobs at smaller companies than those they left, and often form their own businesses. Some 61% changed industries, and 54% take on new workplace roles" (2005 study by the Wharton Center for Leadership and Change; Wall St. Journal, 9/30/09).

FACT: "The probability that a laid-off worker will find a job grows smaller the longer people have been out of work. Someone unemployed for six months is much less likely to find a job in the next month than someone unemployed for one month" (according to studies in the 1980s by economists Lawrence Katz of Harvard University and Bruce Meyer of the University of Chicago; Wall St. Journal, 9/25/09).

FACT: "40% of employers say they expect to hire back some of the workers they laid off in the recession (as full-time employees, consultants or freelancers). About half of financial companies surveyed said they planned to rehire workers, and 47% of manufacturing companies said the same" (OI Partners survey; U.S. News and World Report, 9/17/09).

FACT: Approximately 40% of employees offered outplacement assistance don't show up; some ask for cash instead (Wall St. Journal, 8/20/09).

FACT: College towns typically have lower levels of unemployment. "Of the six metropolitan areas in the U.S. with very low unemployment (below 4%) during the 2008/2009 recession, three of them are considered college towns" (based on Labor Department figures; Wall St. Journal, 3/24/09).

FACT: Older workers are far more likely to endure long-term unemployment (more than six months) than younger workers (AARP study; Wall St. Journal, 3/11/09).

FACT: The top job-search Web sites (according to ComScore; Wall St. Journal, 3/9/09):

  • CareerBuilder — 12.2 million unique visitors in January, 2009
  • Monster.com — 9.5 million
  • Yahoo Hot Jobs — 7.7 million
  • Indeed.com — 7.4 million
  • Simply Hired — 4.3 million

FACT: "Recruiters say the percentage of online applications viewed by an actual human being ranges from 5% to 25%." The other 75% to 95% are purely screened by automated applicant tracking systems (Wall St. Journal, 3/5/09).

FACT: In December, 2008, the average period for joblessness for workers older than 55 was 25 weeks, compared with 18.7 weeks for those under 55 (AARP Public Policy Institute study; Wall St. Journal, 2/23/09).

FACT: There are more than 60,000 job boards on the Web (Wall St. Journal, 2/17/09).

FACT: "34% of HR managers say they currently use social networking Web sites to recruit potential applicants, while another 19% said they plan to do so in the future. Of those who used social-networking sites to screen applicants, 47% said they did so before contacting the applicant for the first time" (2008 member survey by the Society for Human Resource Management; Associated Press, 2/1/09).

FACT: In 2008, the demand for interns increased 15% to 25% (Wall St. Journal, 1/28/09).

FACT: "Research suggests that workers let go during a recession face job hunts that last at least four months. And when they do find work, they typically accept a 20% to 30% pay cut" (Wall St. Journal, 12/29/08).

FACT: There are currently 3.3 unemployed individuals available for every job opening (Wall St. Journal, 12/29/08).

FACT: "The total number of minutes that Internet users spent on job-search Web sites jumped 13% in October, 2008, from a year earlier, while the total number of job-site pages viewed rose 20% in the same period. Overall, the number of unique visitors to job-search sites is up 12% in the past year, more than the 5% increase for the Internet as a whole" (ComScore study; Wall St. Journal, 11/25/08).

FACT: Nearly half of U.S. executives say they secretly visited the location of a potential employer while pursuing a management position. Among those who made visits, slightly more than half said their experience was a determining factor in deciding whether to accept an offer (Wall Street Journal poll of 1,145 U.S. executives; Wall St. Journal, 11/24/08).

FACT: The average employee now changes jobs seven to 10 times in a career, with at least two or three of those moves being jumps to a completely different kind of business (David Reimer, a vice president at outplacement giant DBM; Fortune magazine, 11/21/08).

FACT: Overall, 10% to 15% of job-changers are choosing to enter an entirely new industry — but those figures vary dramatically by industry (David Reimer, a vice president at outplacement giant DBM; Fortune magazine, 11/21/08).

FACT: The average job search in the third quarter of 2008 took nearly 4.4 months (Challenger, Gray & Christmas survey; Wall St. Journal, 12/18/08).

FACT: Approximately 20% of job seekers exaggerate their educational backgrounds (estimate by Kroll Inc., the investigative arm of Marsh & McLennan Cos.; Wall St. Journal, 11/17/08).

FACT: 53% of the 438 executives surveyed believe the best job opportunities are now in developing economies such as Brazil, Russia, India and China (Korn/Ferry International survey; Wall St. Journal, 11/14/08).

FACT: Just 13% of currently employed workers say they are actively looking for a new job — that's down from 30% the last time Accenture conducted a similar survey in 2005 (Accenture Ltd survey; Wall St. Journal, 11/13/08).

FACT: Most career coaches charge $50 to $300 per hour, with some requiring a minimum number of hours. On average, coach-client relationships last from six months to a year (Wall St. Journal, 8/10/08).

FACT: Most job seekers are currently using five job-listing Web sites to find work (Fortune magazine, 5/9/08).

ABOUT TRUTHFULNESS

FACT: Percentage of employers reporting that they perform background screening in the following areas (HireRight survey of 1,400 employers; Workforce Management e-zine, 9/24/09):

  • Criminal = 93%
  • Identity (documents, address history, etc.) = 72%
  • Employment (previous employers, etc.) = 72%
  • Education = 63%
  • Motor vehicle records = 57%
  • References = 48%
  • Credit = 42%
  • Sanctions (exclusion lists, prohibited parties, enforcement, etc.) = 16%
  • Regulated (health care, transportation, finance, education, etc.) = 14%
  • Other = 3%

FACT: "While the vast majority of companies — about 90% — perform background checks on potential employees, the vetting process can vary widely. Practices range from simply contacting references provided by candidates to hiring an outside investigator to check employment history, academic credentials, credit history, press coverage and legal and criminal records" (Wall St. Journal, 11/17/08).

FACT: 61% of HR professionals say they "often" or "sometimes" uncover false claims when vetting prospective hires (2004 survey of HR professionals, Society for Human Resource Management; Wall St. Journal, 11/17/08).

FACT: Executive job candidates most frequently lie about reasons for leaving a previous post, results and accomplishments, and past job responsibilities. Academic credentials were the fifth most-frequently exaggerated type of information (2004 survey of consultants at executive recruiter Korn/Ferry International, Wall St. Journal, 11/17/08).

FACT: Approximately 20% of job-seekers are found to have inflated their educational credentials (estimate by Kroll Inc., the investigative arm of Marsh & McLennan Cos.; Wall St. Journal, 11/13/08).

FACT: A survey of 358 senior executives and directors at 53 publicly traded companies has turned up at least seven instances of these individuals claiming academic degrees they actually don't have (survey by corporate sleuth Barry Minkow; Wall St. Journal, 11/13/08).

FACT: "Only 8% of job applicants admit stretching the truth on their resumes. However, nearly half (49%) of hiring managers report they've caught a candidate lying on their resume. Of those employers, 57% said they automatically dismissed the applicant." (CareerBuilder.com survey of more than 3,100 hiring managers and over 8,700 workers nationwide, conducted from May 22 to June 13, 2008.)

ABOUT JOB-HUNT STRATEGIES

FACT: According to Jobvite’s 2014 hiring report, 40 percent of job seekers found their best or favorite job through a personal connection, and 64 percent of recruiters rate the referred candidates as the “highest quality. Social networks and corporate career sites tied for second place, with 59 percent of recruiters citing it for high quality hires. (U.S. News and World Report, 2/12/14)

FACT: Paid internships offer better opportunities for future employment (National Association of Colleges and Employers study; Today.com, 11/18/13):

  • 63% of paid interns secure a full-time job with the company to which they intern.
  • Only 37% of unpaid interns land jobs with the company to which they intern.

FACT: “Banks and consulting firms have long funneled interns into full-time roles, but now technology firms and startups are beginning to follow suit – increasingly turning to summer M.B.A. talent when they're ready to make permanent hires, with some locking in candidates nearly a year ahead of their start date. At many schools, it isn't uncommon for one-third to a half of M.B.A. students to work for their summer employer after graduation” (Wall St. Journal, 6/5/13):

  • More than 40% of students from Darden's 2012 M.B.A. class took full-time jobs with their summer-internship employers, up from 25% in 2010.
  • At Columbia Business School, 31% of the M.B.A.s who graduated in 2012 took full-time jobs with their summer employers.
  • Companies report that 69% of summer interns who applied for full-time positions received offers, according to a recent survey from the Graduate Management Admission Council, with even higher conversion rates in consulting, finance and accounting.
  • Up to 40% of the 400 full-time M.B.A.s that Bain & Co.'s U.S. operation hires each year are former summer associates.
  • Scott Rostan, founder of Training the Street Inc., which provides financial-training courses for new Wall Street employees, says many of his clients fill 80% to 90% of their full-time classes with interns from the previous summer.

FACT: “Duncan Mathison, an outplacement executive and co-author of the 2009 book "Unlock the Hidden Job Market," concedes that anything hidden is difficult to measure but, by parsing labor statistics and recruiting surveys, he calculates that around 50% of positions are currently filled on an informal basis” [when the hiring manager promotes a current employee or hires an outsider he knows personally]. (Wall St. Journal, 1/8/13)

FACT: 64% of recruiters say they use two or more social-media networks (primarily Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter) to find candidates. About 40% report using three or more of these networks. Of all the social-media networks (most notably Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google Plus, BranchOut and BeKnown), the vast majority of respondents (84%), say they use LinkedIn (Jobvite’s Social Recruiting Survey 2011 – a survey of 800 recruiters and HR professionals; Workforce Management ezine, 8/25/11).

FACT: “During the Depression in Philadelphia, almost 55% of manufacturing workers found jobs through personal connections and another 35% simply by personal initiative, such as knocking on doors" (analysis of interviews with 1930s-era job-seekers by University of Pennsylvania history professor Walter Licht; Wall St. Journal, 8/22/11).

FACT: “While surveys show that personal connections are a primary source of hires, today's job seekers devote little time to their networks: Only 9% of their job search is spent contacting friends and relatives to find work, while 51% is devoted to finding ads and sending out applications,” (research by Princeton economist Alan Krueger and Andreas Mueller of the Columbia Business School; Wall St. Journal, 8/22/11).

FACT: 70% of hiring managers say they would rather see a career summary at the top of a resume than a job objective (CareerBuilder survey; Seattle Times, 7/3/11).

FACT: Management assessments are booming again as companies scramble to find the best leaders amid a hiring rebound. Companies are using business-simulation exercises, role-playing, online personality tests and sit-down talks with an educational psychologist to gauge key traits of C-suite candidates. According to market-research firm Aberdeen Group, 72% of the 516 employers it surveys are now using assessments to help make executive promotion decisions — nearly a 100% increase from 2010. Assessing a C-suite candidate can cost up to $30,000 and last two days (Wall St. Journal, 5/12/11).

FACT: “Although most people involved in seeking talent aren’t formally trained in onomatology, studies have shown that recruiters and hiring managers — consciously or not — assess candidates on the basis of a name. John Cotton, a management professor at Marquette University in Milwaukee is co-author of the 2008 research publication, 'The Name Game: Affective and Hiring Reactions to First Names.' Cotton, whose Ph.D. is in psychology, and his colleagues discovered that common names were best liked and most likely to be hired. Unusual names were least liked and unlikely to be hired, while Russian and African-American names fell somewhere in between but were still much less likely to be hired. ‘People like people who are similar to themselves,’ says Cotton, who advises prospective parents to make safe choices when it comes to naming their babies” (Workforce Management Online, 5/11).

FACT: In 2010, 58% of interns were offered full-time jobs — the highest rate of intern-to-staff hiring since this method of hiring started being tracked in 2001 (National Association of Colleges and Employers, study; CNN Money, 4/28/11).

FACT: A new CareerXroads study finds that about 25% of hires of external candidates come through job boards (Wall St. Journal, 4/4/11).

FACT: Referrals from current employees is how most companies find the majority (27.5%) of the outside job candidates they hire (10th annual CareerXroads “Source of Hire” report, 3/11).

FACT: “Niche job boards continue to proliferate, allowing employers to go directly to the A-level performers, who typically focus their job search efforts on specialized search engines.” Today, there are more than 100,000 Internet job boards — double the number in 2000 (Weddles research; Workforce Management magazine, 3/11).

FACT: Although 63% of recruiters and recruiting supervisors say their organizations use social media to search for job candidates, the success rate is relatively low. Almost 53% of those organizations said 10% or fewer of their hires came through social networking. That said, more than half of senior recruiting executives say they expect their companies to increase the use of social networking to attract talent in the next 12 to 18 months (December 2010 Workforce Management survey; Workforce Management magazine, 2/11).

FACT: According to a December survey from the Corporate Executive Board, about 24% of companies plan to decrease their usage of third-party employment websites and job boards this year, because, they say, the tools generate “mostly unqualified leads.” In place of job boards, nearly 80% of the survey respondents said they plan to increase their use of alternative hiring methods, such as employee referrals and social media websites (Wall St. Journal, 1/18/11).

FACT: “Workers with less than a high-school diploma were likelier to keep their jobs during the recession if they lived in a handful of metro areas with the highest concentrations of employees with college degrees, according to a paper released Friday by Alan Berube, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. ‘Where you are matters,’ Mr Brube said. ‘If you’re a worker without a high school diploma, you are better off being in a highly educated labor market like Seattle than being in a less educated labor market like Scranton’” (Wall St. Journal, 11/8/10).

FACT: “Referrals – that is, a connection made by someone you know – remain your best bet for landing a job. CareerXRoads’ annual survey of more than 200 employers show that the percentage of hires made through referrals has remained remarkably consistent over the last five years. Nearly 27% of respondents said referrals were the biggest factor in external hires in 2009, practically unchanged from its 27.1% figure in 2005. Third-party agencies, meanwhile, accounted for only 2.3% of external hires last year, compared to a 5.2% success rate in 2005 (Smart Money magazine, 10/25/10).

FACT: CareerXRoads’ annual survey of more than 200 employers shows that “positions explicitly advertised as temp-to-perm accounted for just 1.6% of all hiring in 2009 – and even in better times that rate was only around 3%. ‘Temp-to-perm is basically a marketing ploy’ says Nick Corcodilos, who heads the executive search firm North Bridge Group. ‘It’s really what recruiters would like to see happen’ (Smart Money magazine, 10/25/10).

FACT: "The trend towards intern pool hiring [hiring interns for full-time jobs] has come on very strong in the past three to five years, according to Monica Wilson, acting co-director of career services at Dartmouth College. 'Internship recruiting will largely replace entry-level recruiting in the next few years,' she says" (Wall St. Journal, 9/13/10).

FACT: "A quarter of the nearly 480 respondents to The Wall Street Journal's survey of college recruiters said more than 50% of their new-graduate hires had been interns at their companies; 14% said more than 75% were. Similarly, the National Association of Colleges and Employers reported in its 2010 Internship & Co-op Survey that nearly 57% of students from the class of 2009 were converted from interns to full-time hires, up from 50% the previous year" (Wall St. Journal, 9/13/10).

FACT: More than 80% of the new-graduates General Electric Co. hires each year have worked as interns for the company, according to Steve Canale, head of GE's recruiting efforts (Wall St. Journal, 9/13/10).

FACT: LinkedIn users who update and expand their profiles are about 40 times more likely to receive opportunities through the networking service than those with incomplete profiles (LinkedIn senior public relations manager, Krista Canfield, Wall St. Journal, 7/8/10).

FACT: Fortune 500 companies fill just 13% of their open jobs using job-board websites (CareerXroads survey, Fortune magazine, 6/14/10).

FACT: About 73% of the resumes on the Monster.com job-board site are for people who are currently employed (Monster.com estimate, Fortune magazine, 6/14/10).

FACT: "On average, surveys find, the unemployed in the U.S. spend 40 minutes a day looking for work and three hours and 20 minutes a day watching TV" (Wall St. Journal, 5/6/10).

FACT: The following advice is widely quoted as fact, but there are no actual studies to back it up: "It takes one month of searching for every $10,000 in salary you seek."

FACT: Even during the depths of the recession (2008 and 2009), only 15% of job-seekers across the country said they were willing to relocate to another city to find work (Right Management survey, 2/24/10).

FACT: A recent review of applications by the Fireman's Fund Insurance Company showed only about 20% of applicants include cover letters. Of those, about 30% of the letters contain mistakes (usually something blatant &mdash such as they're addressed to the wrong company or the recipient's name is misspelled). Clare Shanahan, senior director of talent acquisition for Fireman's Fund Insurance Co.; Wall St. Journal, 3/9/10.

FACT: 23% of 2009 college graduates who had an internship (and applied for jobs) had a job by April. Only 14% of those who hadn't worked in an internship had a job by that same time (National Association of Colleges and Employers report; Seattle Times, 12/12/09).

FACT: There are more than 400,000 places candidates can search for work (Workforce Recruiting newsletter, 11/12/09; Bureau of Labor Statistics).

FACT: 39% of workers say they chose temporary work because they couldn't find a permanent/regular job. Some 3% say they chose a temporary job to learn new skills (Workforce Recruiting newsletter, 11/12/09; Bureau of Labor Statistics).

FACT: In the corporate world, more than 50% of interns are offered full-time jobs. In the public sector, however, only 7% of people who take government internships are offered jobs (survey by Partnership for Public Service, a nonprofit watchdog group; Wall St. Journal, 10/26/09).

FACT: "The probability that a laid-off worker will find a job grows smaller the longer people have been out of work. Someone unemployed for six months is much less likely to find a job in the next month than someone unemployed for one month" (according to studies in the 1980s by economists Lawrence Katz of Harvard University and Bruce Meyer of the University of Chicago; Wall St. Journal, 9/25/09).

FACT: In 2009, 18.2% of job-seekers had to relocate for the job they landed — that's compared to 11.4% for 2008 (Challenger, Gray & Christmas survey of 1,450 successful job-seekers; Wall St. Journal, 9/22/09).

FACT: Executives estimate that about 40% of employees offered outplacement assistance don't show up; some ask for cash instead (Wall St. Journal, 8/20/09).

FACT: In 2009, just 12% of recent new hires found work through job boards, while 27% landed a job using referrals (CareerXRoads survey of HR managers at large companies; Slate.com, 3/17/09).

FACT: At PricewaterhouseCoopers, more than 40% of new-hires (not including college recruits) come through employee referrals (Bob Daugherty, head of U.S. recruiting for PricewaterhouseCoopers; Wall St. Journal, 3/18/09).

FACT: "34% of HR managers say they currently use social networking Web sites to recruit potential applicants, while another 19% said they plan to do so in the future. Of those who used social-networking sites to screen applicants, 47% said they did so before contacting the applicant for the first time" (2008 member survey by the Society for Human Resource Management; Associated Press, 2/1/09).

FACT: People who use a career coach find jobs 15% to 46% faster than those who don't (study by talent management firm Lee Hecht Harrison; Wall St. Journal, 1/27/09).

FACT: In 2008, the demand for interns increased 15% to 25% (Wall St. Journal, 1/28/09).

FACT: The vast majority of jobs (70%) are not advertised — which means the only way of uncovering them is via networking (Ali Chambers, a vice president of ClearRock, an executive coaching and outplacement firm in Boston; Wall St. Journal, 1/20/09)

FACT: Only about 3% of jobs are filled by outside headhunters (year 2000 Forrester Research study; Seattle Times, 1/18/09).

FACT: Approximately 60% of the temporary workers who sign with Manpower Inc., one of the nation's largest staffing agencies, get a permanent assignment through the company (Manpower Inc. chairman Jeffrey Joerres; Wall St. Journal, 12/29/08).

FACT: More than 88% of former temporary workers say their stints as temps made them more employable (2006 survey of 13,000 former temporary workers by the American Staffing Association; Wall St. Journal, 12/29/08).

FACT: Before going to outplacement training, about 70% of executives say they already know what they need to do to land their next job. After completing the training, only about 20% will still claim they knew what was necessary beforehand (Douglas Matthews, president of Right Management; Wall St. Journal, 12/16/08).

FACT: "The total number of minutes that Internet users spent on job-search Web sites jumped 13% in October, 2008, from a year earlier, while the total number of job-site pages viewed rose 20% in the same period. Overall, the number of unique visitors to job-search sites is up 12% in the past year, more than the 5% increase for the Internet as a whole" (ComScore study; Wall St. Journal, 11/25/08).

FACT: National Career Fairs, a Las Vegas-based company that organizes fairs for job site Monster.com, says job-seeker attendance jumped 40.7% in 2008, from a year earlier. Job site CareerBuilder.com reported a 33% increase in job-seeker job-fair attendance. Targeted Job Fairs, a producer of technology, engineering and security-clearance career fairs, has seen attendance at its job fairs increase about 16%. However, job-fair attendance by employers is shrinking (Wall St. Journal, 10/30/08).

FACT: Approximately 60% of the executives that complete the Right Management outplacement training end up finding a job within 90 days (Wall St. Journal, 10/22/08).

FACT: About 42% of professional workers find jobs via a networking contact (Right Management survey; Wall St. Journal, 10/22/08).

FACT: Most job seekers are currently using five job-listing Web sites to find work (Fortune magazine, 5/9/08).

FACT: A survey of corporate internship programs conducted by the National Association of Colleges, 3/28/08, found:

  • Nearly 36% of the college graduates in 2007 came from internship programs (that's up from 30% for the class of 2005).
  • Nearly 90% of employers who use their programs to hire say they are very or extremely satisfied with their interns.
  • Employers consistently name their internship program as one of the most effective tools they have for hiring new college graduates.
  • More than one-third of employers (37.3%) reported higher retention among those converted from intern to employee within the first year of hire. And nearly half (48.8%) said former interns had higher retention five years after hire.

FACT: A 2007 Accountemps national poll of hiring managers at 1,000 of the country's largest companies found the following opinions about thank-you notes:

  • 88% of executives said sending a thank-you note following an interview can boost a job seeker's chances.
  • 49% of executives said job applicants fail to send a thank-you note.
  • 52% of executives prefer handwritten thank-you notes; 44% prefer e-mail thank-yous.

FACT: Nearly 15% of hiring managers say they would not hire someone who failed to send a thank-you note after an interview. Some 32% say they would still consider the candidate, but would think less of him or her. Some 26% of hiring managers expect to have a thank-you note in-hand two days after the interview, and 36% expect to have it within three to five days (CareerBuilder.com survey, May 27, 2005).

FACT: In 2002, more than 50% of both first- and second-year students found employment through sources other than on-campus recruiting (The Wharton Journal, 3/23/03).

 

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To see more employment facts, visit the main Crown Resume Facts page.